YIN TESTIMONIAL: Releasing physical and emotional tightness

Meet long-time Bikram practitioner turned Yin lover Lucy!

Yin yoga has been such an unexpected gem to find at Hot Yoga Richmond. As a former ballet dancer, runner, and swimmer, I started yoga as a means to continue my athletic journey but in a safer, less impactful environment as well as to heal some injuries that have plagued me for decades. The 26&2 series immediately appealed to my inner athlete and Type A personality — challenging, , sweaty, lots of cardio, and a feeling of accomplishment at the end of every class. but when I attended the Yin teacher training with Ida Ripley, I learned a whole new benefit to slow, intentional, and mindful stretching. Yin uses gentle poses for long periods of time — the depth of the posture is not the goal, but instead you use the long holds in postures to move and stretch rarely protracted fascia. The 26&2 class is very yang, which means you use your muscles to stretch your ligaments and tendons. The goal of yin is to NOT use your muscles — may the hardest part for me to learn! At the end of a 60 or 75min warm Yin class I feel restored (rather than depleted) and my joints and ligaments feel realigned and open without feeling painful or tight. And without sounding completely off my rocker, I’ve even had emotional releases from these types of postures, which I understand is a common reaction in Yin practitioners. Releasing physical and emotional tightness is now a benefit that my body craves. Yin is the perfect compliment to a 26&2 practice as well as a wonderful yoga for first-timers or athletes trying to find new ways to improve the function of their bodies.

 Lucy Homiller

Lucy Homiller

Bikram Yoga Richmond